I am delighted to have had the chance to read this blog post from a fellow WordPress blogger. I really hope that you enjoy hearing from another voice for a change here at the theomusicology blog. Please also note that I have responded in some detail to this post in the comments below (or replies as they appear to be called here) and so do read all the comments as well as the post to get the clearest possible picture! Feel free to post any further comments wherever you like, we’ll both be up for them… As always, God bless!

James Birchenough

As part of my English Lit degree, I’m doing a free-choice philosophy module this semester. Each week we learn about the views of a different ‘big thinker’, starting with Plato and ending up with people like Foucault and Freud, focusing in particular on how their teachings affected what people know and how they know it. I was quite excited to learn that one week we’d focus on Jesus, and as our lecturer is a fervent atheist I was really intrigued about how the lecture would go. The set reading was some extracts from Matthew’s Gospel in the King James Version, which, despite having a great name, is quite hard to read. Feeling a bit rebellious, I decided to read from the NIV version instead. After all, I don’t think Jesus would have used the Aramaic equivalents of ‘thee’ and ‘thou’ when He spoke: I’m sure He spoke in the everyday language of the people He was speaking to, so why shouldn’t I read His words in my everyday language too?

Anyway, I had the lecture last week and it didn’t…

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